My Way or the Highway

Description:
Have students find their path in a game which combines mazes with teamwork.

Supplies:
1. Paper Plates OR Masking Tape
2. Sheets of paper work too, but not nearly as well.

Instructions:
1. Facilitators begin by laying out a 4×4 grid – either with paper plates, or some other material
2. Then Facilitators create a maze path on a separate sheet of paper – a “map”
a. The path must begin on one side of the grid, and end on another.
b. Usually, grid units are connected vertically or horizontally
c. You can go backward in your path, as long as the path begins and ends on opposite sides
3. Participants line up on the beginning side of the grid.
4. Explain to participants that they will start out on the grid on one side and travel to the other, but they will have to find path through trial and error.
a. When a participant gets a step wrong, they have to go to the back of the line.
b. It is the facilitators responsibility to monitor their movements compared to the predecided “map”
c. The next participants use what was learned by the people before them
d. The participants will continue this process, until someone makes it to the other side following the correct path.
e. Once established, each other participant must repeat the path to the other side
5. Participants cannot talk to each other. However, they can make gestures.
6. Once all students make it to the other side, the game is over.

Debrief Questions:
What was difficult about this game?
How did it feel to watch others make mistakes?
Was it helpful when others made angry noises? Why or why not?
How did it feel to make mistakes in front of others?
Who won this game?
Trick question – no one, or everyone
Prebrief Ideas (optional):
How do we learn from our mistakes?
When you are struggling, what is and is not helpful for others to do?
What does it mean to pay attention?
Potential Twists:
Create larger grids
Have students retrace their steps immediately afterward
Hide “treasure” under certain grid parts, that combine to make a picture – etc.
Have students create their own maps/facilitate the game
Remove the rules regarding there being a start side and an ending side, and allow the path to go diagonally.